WRITING ABOUT MUSIC

The new book by Luca Chiantore, Áurea Domínguez and Silvia Martinez is a text without precedents in Spanish language. It offers students and professionals a coherent framework for writing texts about music in all its dimensions, based on the heterogeneous musical tradition and musicological of Spanish-speaking countries.

© Luca Chiantore, Áurea Domínguez and Silvia Martinez Garcia Moreno, 2016

© of all editions in Spanish: Musikeon Books, 2016

First Edition: April 2016

221 pages

ISBN 978-84-945117-0-7

Legal deposit: B 6345-2016

Cover design: Design Studio Imagofactum

Charts printed in San Sadurní, Sant Joan Despi (Barcelona)
Retail price: 20 €

PRESENTATION

Tchaikovsky Tchaikovsky Tchaikovsky Tchaikovsky or …? Why is it wrong to write Sonata Op. 111 No. 32? Bebop, be bop or bebop? Does greater Fa is written with initial caps? How to focus research in music? What cite, cite when and why to cite How to adapt to the Spanish language citation international standards? APA, Chicago or MLA? How to mention a post on Facebook or Youtube video?

When it comes to writing about music, these and many other questions have only one possible answer. The absence of shared criteria is a fact, and placed particular emphasis on the Spanish-speaking world, where we are witnessing a growing incorporation of imported models of the English language that do not conform to the specifics of our language. All this in a context that is seething: the Latin American musicology has a growing international presence and we are confronted daily with the challenge to integrate on a scientific exchange on a global scale, while linking practice music with the university context It implies new challenges for everyone.

This stylebook, without precedents in Spanish language is the product of a long process of reflection and comparison with similar texts published in other languages. Among its many features, is the possibility of acquiring the following editions only paying the cost, to enjoy a text on paper that is constantly updated. Written thinking in both students and professionals of music and musicology, provides a coherent framework for addressing drafting texts and makes musical theme based on the heterogeneous reality of Spanish-speaking countries.

INDEX OF CONTENTS

Part 1 WRITING AS COMMUNICATION

1 LOOKING FOR A PLAYER … OR READING

1.1 Write to share knowledge
Research vs. 1.2 divulgation?
1.3 Research and doctoral thesis
1.4 main ideas and supporting details
1.5 Theoretical frameworks and epistemological perspectives
1.6 Registration and property linguistic language
1.7 figurative language and terminological vagueness
1.8 Acts, intentions and expressive implications
1.9 First person or not?
1.10 Looking for a non-sexist language
1.11 The importance of a good title
1.12 articles, reviews and other short texts
1.13 Desktop publishing and layout of text
1.14 The professional edition of a book
1.15 proofreading

2 THE DOCUMENTARY WORK

2.1 Sources
2.2 How, when and why quote
2.3 vs. bibliographic System author-date system
2.4 The right to quote and copyright
2.5 Bibliography, references and bibliographic references
2.6 Notes
2.7 Remissions
2.8 Musical examples, figures, tables and illustrations

3 grammar and spelling OF SPANISH APPLIED TO SPECIFIC MUSIC

3.1 Specifics grammatical writing about music
3.2 Place Names and gentilicios
3.3 General criteria for the use of italics, bold, capitalized letters
3.4 extranjerismos terminology and translation errors
3.5 Spelling Anglicisms
3.6 Spelling in numbers and dates
3.7 punctuation marks
3.8 Abbreviations

Part 2 orthotypographic MUSICAL STANDARDS TECHNICAL VOCABULARY

4 MUSICAL WORKS
4.1 The title of musical works
4.2 Generic titles
4.3 The sections of a work
4.4 Catalog numbers and other identifying information

5 ELEMENTS OF MUSICAL SYSTEM

5.1 Notes and tessitura
5.2 modes, scales, rhythmic structures and related concepts
5.3 Musical forms
5.4 Interpretive signs
5.5 Numbers and letters

6 names

6.1 Spelling and rules regarding personal names
6.2 Spelling of names of groups, organizations, venues and places
Voices and instruments 6.3
6.4 Concepts related to the study of music

Part 3 BIBLIOGRAPHY AND DOCUMENTARY REFERENCES

7 QUOTES AND REFERENCES (I): the Bibliographical SYSTEM

7.1 General rules
Books 7.2: recurring doubts and specific problems
7.3 Encyclopedias, dictionaries and works in several volumes
7.4 Chapters or parts of a book
7.5 Periodicals in print and online
7.6 texts in digital format
7.7 Sources devoid unpublished or ISBN / ISSN
7.8 prologues, critical comments and texts linked to scores

8 QUOTES AND REFERENCES (II): SYSTEM AUTHOR DATE

8.1 General rules
Books 8.2: recurring doubts and specific problems
8.3 Encyclopedias, dictionaries and works in several volúmenen
8.4 Chapters or parts of a book
8.5 Periodicals in print and online
8.6 Texts on digital media
8.7 Sources devoid unpublished or ISBN / ISSN
8.8 prologues, critical comments and texts linked to scores

9 sound and audiovisual documents

9.1 General criteria
9.2 sound and audiovisual documents consulted in hardware
9.3 Sound and Audiovisual documents consulted online
9.4 Documents consulted sound and audiovisual archives
9.5 Radio and Television

10 Other documentation

10.1 General criteria
10.2 Scores
10.3 Laws, patents, business documents and related texts
10.4 unpublished interviews from fieldwork
10.5 concerts and other live performances
10.6 Websites, applications and software

INDEX OF NAMES AND SUBJECTS